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Mail Archives: geda-user/2012/03/16/13:27:24

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Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2012 12:59:21 -0400
Message-ID: <CAPFCoitVa9HXYD7tEvh01_EzpNrmA_UZq76Buap1uk_Qn-q-ZA@mail.gmail.com>
Subject: Re: [geda-user] Daughter's Science Fair
From: John Hudak <jjhudak AT gmail DOT com>
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The magnetic field needs to be changing in order to induce a current in the
other coil.  You can do this in two ways:
1) Use a AC power source instead of the DC battery
2) Keep the DC battery, align the second coil and nail combination parallel
to the powered coil and nail, and move the second coil up and down parallel
to the powered coil.  By cutting the lines of magnet flux, and current will
flow in the second coil and nail. You may need to wrap a lot more turns on
the second nail to notice any current flow.  the current flow will be
small, as in microamps to maybe 1 millAmp.  A physics text book will
provide the equations to use to give you guidance on flux calculation,
number of turns in a coil, and current that can be induced.
The topic you want to investigate is Faradays Law of Induction.

Then again, there is probably many similar experiments outline on the web,
or you could look up Faradays Law on the web with related examples...

Good luck
John


On Fri, Mar 16, 2012 at 10:02 AM, Rob Butts <r DOT butts2 AT gmail DOT com> wrote:

> My nine-year-old daughter has a science fair tomorrow.  We are doing
> simple electromagnets out of nails.  We are just using one C battery with
> approximately a 30-penny nail and 26 guage wire wrapped around the nail for
> two layers.  When the battery is connected the nail has a good magnetic
> strength in that it will pick up another nail not just paper clips.
>
> I was thinking about showing how a current in one coil will induce a
> current in another (how an electric toothbrush charges).  We rigged up
> another nail the same way but with a little bulb attached.  Check my
> theory, shouldn't the electromagnetic field produced by the coil and nail
> with the battery induce a current in the other coil when placing the nails
> adjacent and parallel?
>

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The magnetic field needs to be changing in order to induce a current in the=
 other coil.=A0 You can do this in two ways:<br>1) Use a AC power source in=
stead of the DC battery<br>2) Keep the DC battery, align the second coil an=
d nail combination parallel to the powered coil and nail, and move the seco=
nd coil up and down parallel to the powered coil.=A0 By cutting the lines o=
f magnet flux, and current will flow in the second coil and nail. You may n=
eed to wrap a lot more turns on the second nail to notice any current flow.=
=A0 the current flow will be small, as in microamps to maybe 1 millAmp.=A0 =
A physics text book will provide the equations to use to give you guidance =
on flux calculation, number of turns in a coil, and current that can be ind=
uced.=A0 <br>
The topic you want to investigate is Faradays Law of Induction.<br><br>Then=
 again, there is probably many similar experiments outline on the web, or y=
ou could look up Faradays Law on the web with related examples...<br><br>
Good luck<br>John<br><br><br><div class=3D"gmail_quote">On Fri, Mar 16, 201=
2 at 10:02 AM, Rob Butts <span dir=3D"ltr">&lt;<a href=3D"mailto:r DOT butts2 AT g=
mail.com">r DOT butts2 AT gmail DOT com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class=3D"=
gmail_quote" style=3D"margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-=
left:1ex">
<div>My nine-year-old daughter has a science fair tomorrow.=A0 We are doing=
 simple electromagnets out of nails.=A0 We are just using one C battery wit=
h approximately a=A030-penny nail and 26 guage wire wrapped around the nail=
 for two layers.=A0 When the battery is connected the nail has a good magne=
tic strength in that it will pick up another nail not just paper clips.</di=
v>

<div>=A0</div><div>I was thinking about showing how a current in one coil w=
ill induce a current in another (how an electric toothbrush charges).=A0 We=
 rigged up another nail the same way but with a little bulb attached.=A0 Ch=
eck my theory, shouldn&#39;t the electromagnetic field produced by the coil=
 and nail with the battery induce a current in the other coil when placing =
the nails adjacent and=A0parallel?</div>

</blockquote></div><br>

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